The benefits to all of ensuring equal and timely access to influenza vaccines in poor communities.

TitleThe benefits to all of ensuring equal and timely access to influenza vaccines in poor communities.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsLee BY, Brown ST, Bailey RR, Zimmerman RK, Potter MA, McGlone SM, Cooley PC, Grefenstette JJ, Zimmer SM, Wheaton WD, Quinn SCrouse, Voorhees RE, Burke DS
JournalHealth Aff (Millwood)
Volume30
Issue6
Pagination1141-50
Date Published2011 Jun
ISSN1544-5208
KeywordsComputer Simulation, District of Columbia, Health Services Accessibility, Humans, Immunization Programs, Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype, Influenza Vaccines, Influenza, Human, Poverty Areas, Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract

When influenza vaccines are in short supply, allocating vaccines equitably among different jurisdictions can be challenging. But justice is not the only reason to ensure that poorer counties have the same access to influenza vaccines as do wealthier ones. Using a detailed computer simulation model of the Washington, D.C., metropolitan region, we found that limiting or delaying vaccination of residents of poorer counties could raise the total number of influenza infections and the number of new infections per day at the peak of an epidemic throughout the region-even in the wealthier counties that had received more timely and abundant vaccine access. Among other underlying reasons, poorer counties tend to have high-density populations and more children and other higher-risk people per household, resulting in more interactions and both increased transmission of influenza and greater risk for worse influenza outcomes. Thus, policy makers across the country, in poor and wealthy areas alike, have an incentive to ensure that poorer residents have equal access to vaccines.

DOI10.1377/hlthaff.2010.0778
Alternate JournalHealth Aff (Millwood)
PubMed ID21653968
PubMed Central IDPMC3385997
Grant List1U54GM088491-0109 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
P60 MD000207 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
U54 GM088491 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
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