An outbreak of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in an elementary school in Pennsylvania.

TitleAn outbreak of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in an elementary school in Pennsylvania.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsMarchbanks TL, Bhattarai A, Fagan RP, Ostroff S, Sodha SV, Moll ME, Lee BY, Chang C-CH, Ennis B, Britz P, Fiore A, Nguyen M, Palekar R, W Archer R, Gift TL, Leap R, Nygren BL, Cauchemez S, Angulo FJ, Swerdlow D
Corporate AuthorsPennsylvania Working Group
JournalClin Infect Dis
Volume52 Suppl 1
PaginationS154-60
Date Published2011 Jan 1
ISSN1537-6591
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Child, Preschool, Disease Outbreaks, Female, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Infection Control, Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype, Influenza, Human, Interviews as Topic, Male, Middle Aged, Pennsylvania, Schools, Young Adult
Abstract

In May 2009, one of the earliest outbreaks of 2009 pandemic influenza A virus (pH1N1) infection resulted in the closure of a semi-rural Pennsylvania elementary school. Two sequential telephone surveys were administered to 1345 students (85% of the students enrolled in the school) and household members in 313 households to collect data on influenza-like illness (ILI). A total of 167 persons (12.4%) among those in the surveyed households, including 93 (24.0%) of the School A students, reported ILI. Students were 3.1 times more likely than were other household members to develop ILI (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-4.1). Fourth-grade students were more likely to be affected than were students in other grades (relative risk, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-3.9). pH1N1 was confirmed in 26 (72.2%) of the individuals tested by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The outbreak did not resume upon the reopening of the school after the 7-day closure. This investigation found that pH1N1 outbreaks at schools can have substantial attack rates; however, grades and classrooms are affected variably. Additional study is warranted to determine the effectiveness of school closure during outbreaks.

DOI10.1093/cid/ciq058
Alternate JournalClin. Infect. Dis.
PubMed ID21342888
PubMed Central IDPMC3738229
Grant ListU54 GM088491 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
U60/CCU007277 / / PHS HHS / United States
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